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This critical part performs two functions.  It is the the top (third) point of the 3-point hitch, necessary to stabilize and control many rear attachments.   It is also necessary to use the rear lift to lift any rear implements.  This includes tillers and those connected a standard sleeve hitch.  The lift rod (or cable, for newer tractors) running from the lift handle (or hydro lift or electric lift mechanism) attaches to the hole in the top, while an attaching rod from the implement to be lifted goes into the large open tube and is locked in place with a pin down through both the tube and the attaching rod.  The shafts on the each side mount this part onto the rear hitch arms, and allow it to pivot up and down when the lift rod (or cable) pulls or pushes.  This part is also necessary for the factory rear counterweight that is used to offset the weight of front implements like dozer blades or snowthrowers.  On the right, below, is an original rear lift point, while one that Brent Baumer fabricated is on the left.  See Brent's drawings below for detailed instructions on how to fabricate your own.

Click each drawing for a closer view


 

Here's an example of one fabricated for Chad Schaefer (Agco918), using these instructions.

 

 

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